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Labour rights are Human rights

Historical Events

November 30, 2007

The Quebec Superior Court ruled that Quebec's 2003 An Act to modify bargaining units and local bargaining (Bill 30) violates the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The law forced the merger of union certifications in the health and social services network, and modified the system of negotiations by decentralizing 26 matters to the local level.

November 12, 1995

This marked the beginning of a ten-day wildcat strike by Alberta health care workers when 120 laundry workers members walked off the job after the Calgary Regional Health Authority declared they were contracting out their jobs to a private company. The walk-out sparked sympathy strikes by other hospital workers effectively shutting down the city's hospital services. Striking workers defied two Labour Relation Board rulings to return to work. The Regional Health Authority applied for a court injunction, but didn't act on it after Premier Ralph Klein told them to back off. After a 19 hour marathon negotiating session to avert a province-wide general strike, an agreement was reached on November 23 which provided an eight-month moratorium on contracting out and a commitment from the Premier of no further budget cuts in health care for at least a year. Although Alberta legislation has denied the right to strike for health care workers since 1983, the province has one of the highest rates of strike activity in the health care sector.

November 7, 1973

With the passage of the Labour Code of British Columbia Act (Bill 11), British Columbia became the first jurisdiction in Canada to impose first contract arbitration on employers and unions that are unable to negotiate a first collective agreement. Currently, only New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and Alberta do not have legislation providing for binding arbitration of a first collective agreement.

November 26, 1963

It was this day that Quebec Premier Jean Lesage in his opening statement at the Federal-Provincial Conference in Ottawa made this famous quote "The Queen does not negotiate with her subjects", referring to his opposition to granting collective bargaining rights to public employees. It didn't take long for him to change his mind. A little more than a year later in an attempt to make peace with an increasing militant Quebec labour movement, his government introduced legislation which provided collective bargaining rights to all public sector workers in the province. Prior to that the only province to grant collective bargaining rights public employees was Saskatchewan 1944.

November 14, 1944

Saskatchewan's new CCF government passed the Trade Union Act, the first legislation of its kind in North America to give government employees the right to form unions and bargain collectively including the right to strike.

November 30, 2007

The Quebec Superior Court ruled that Quebec’s 2003 An Act to modify bargaining units and local bargaining (Bill 30) violates the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The law forced the merger of union certifications in the health and social services network, and modified the system of negotiations by decentralizing 26 matters to the local level.

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Draft and sponsor a resolution to your Federation of Labour or Labour Council condemning the use of labour laws that restrict or deny the fundamental rights of workers and proposing that progressive labour law reform be a central focus of labour’s political agenda.

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